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Mortimer designs and builds website for animal shelter

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Independent Photo || SHARON DODSON
2019 Rogers Scholar Andrew Mortimer designed and built a website, Whiskers or Wags, for the Johnson County Animal Shelter for his community service project. The website is user-friendly, easily accessible, and interactive with visitors.

2019 Rogers Scholar and Magoffin County High School student Andrew Mortimer is working to bridge the gap between animals in need and technology.

For his Rogers Scholars community service project, Mortimer designed and built a website, Whiskers or Wags, for the Johnson County Animal Shelter. 

“At first, I wanted to raise money for the shelter to help pay for cat litter, dog food, vet care, and a never-ending list of vital supplies, but when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, it became evident they needed an online presence,” Mortimer said. “I wanted to help them not only feature their adoptable animals online, but also give the public a place to donate or volunteer. I see this as something that hopefully will benefit the shelter for many years to come.”

The website is user-friendly, easily accessible, and interactive with visitors. At www.johnsoncountyanimalshelter.org, the public can view photos of animals currently housed at the shelter, adopt a pet, donate to the organization, and volunteer to serve. 

“Andrew’s initiative and willingness to take on the task and time needed to build a website for the Johnson County Animal Shelter is so appreciated and will help the shelter in many ways,” said director Lisa Trusty-Roberts. “From helping to find home for stray and abused animals to procuring funds and gathering donations, a website is a precious tool for any animal shelter.” 

In addition to building the website, Mortimer also raised funds to pay for the hosting costs of the website for one full year.

“This organization is not a money-making venture. These people save animals, take care of them, and find them homes, often putting in their own time and money to do so,” Mortimer said. “This website will help to have a larger network of people to adopt, donate, and volunteer, as they continue to serve the neglected, abused, stray, and surrendered animals in our community.”

Each graduate of The Center for Rural Development’s Rogers Scholars program is required to complete a community service project. For more information about Rogers Scholars, visit www.centeryouthprograms.com.
 

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